Samsung Could Skip Exynos Altogether for Galaxy S IV

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The choice of SoC for Samsung’s Galaxy S IV has been the subject of much contention lately. While many Samsung fans would like to see a next-generation Exynos chip powering the smartphone, we’ve been growing increasingly skeptical that such a thing could really come to pass. After all, a number of separate benchmark results for devices that appear to be some of the regional and carrier variants of the Galaxy S IV have been reporting GPUs that just don’t match with what we’re expecting from any Exynos chips, let alone the Exynos 5 Octa. A new rumor suggests that there’s a good reason for that, and Samsung could be releasing the GS4 with Snapdragon 600 chips for all its variants.

The theory does make some sense; the 600 employs the Adreno 320 GPU we’ve seen in these benchmarks, and the CPU’s maximum clock speed fits with what they report. Rumors out of Korea suggest that, in spite of the Exynos 5 Octa’s set of four low-power cores, power consumption is still a concern, and could be contributing to Samsung’s decision to go with Qualcomm components while it works to improve its own chips.

That’s not necessarily a bad thing, as we’ve already seen the 600 in the HTC One give some pretty impressive performance, but this might still hurt GS4 sales, especially if Samsung can’t so easily establish that its own phone is superior to its competition, running the same chips.

Source: Digital Times (Google Translate)
Via: phoneArena

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!