Curved-Screen iPhones: The Intentional And Unintentional Routes

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A pair of Apple stories crossed our desk today that, while seemingly unrelated, both manage to involve iPhones with curved displays. Just how they end up that way, though, is a very different case for each:

First off, Apple was granted a patent covering a method for shaping glass. Apple’s process uses high temperatures and is intended to overcome the shortcomings of other glass shaping techniques, which include the need to grind away un-shaped edges and a tendency to stretch the glass, resulting in localized regions where it may become too thin. While there’s no telling how (or if) Apple will actually employ the patent, one obvious use would be an iPhone with a curved display.

That news is a bit funny when viewed in light of this other story to catch our eye, where some new iPhone 5 owners have been accidentally bending their phones. Supposedly, this spate of cases is tied to the phone’s recent introduction in China, where clumsy owners have been sitting down with their phones still in their rear pants pockets.

This sort of damage doesn’t really seem to be a sign of any sort of manufacturing issue, though it does call attention to just how soft the alloy is used to form the iPhone 5’s shell. It’s also remarkable to see just how far the phone’s glass seems able to bend without outright shattering. Maybe it’s time to find a new pocket for the phone?

Source: USPTO, Nowhereelse (Google Translate)
Via: BGR, The Droid Guy

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!