Instead Of $99 Nexus 7, New Rumors Look To $129-149 Tablet

Advertisement

The $99 Nexus tablet is one rumor that just won’t go away. It’s not like the Nexus 7 isn’t already one of the most affordable Android tablets around, but it just hasn’t been able to shake this rumor that ASUS and Google could be cooking-up an even cheaper version. So far, that $99 price point has been the focus of these claims, but some new rumors suggest that while the tablet may soon be a reality, you could end up paying just a smidge more for it.

Supposedly, the companies will be using China’s O-Film Tech to produce the touchscreens for this new Nexus, and by using components employing glass-film-film technology, ASUS and Google could hope to see some big savings. The rumors suggest that, while the finished product might end up costing just about $99 to manufacture, the need to turn at least a small profit would result in the model selling for something in the $129 to $149 range. That may not be what you were hoping for, and it certainly lacks the same appeal of a $99 price tag, but the savings may be enough for Google to get the attention of a whole lot more consumers.

Besides being cheaper, this new Nexus would reportedly be thinner than the Nexus 7, as well. If what these sources are saying is correct, the tablet could be ready for release sometime in the first quarter of next year, though a second quarter release may be more likely; that might mean we’d get a chance to see it at the CES or MWC.

Source: DigiTimes
Via: MobileSyrup

Advertisement

What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!