New Info Continues To Paint Confusing Picture Of Samsung ATIV S Arrival

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There continues to be a ton of uncertainty surrounding the release of Samsung’s first Windows Phone 8 handset, the ATIV S. Samsung announced the model about three months ago now, and since then there’s been precious little evidence of headway towards the phone’s release. We’ve heard some things about the ATIV S finally arriving in December, as well as some claims that we wouldn’t get to see the smartphone until 2013. Today we’ve got two new pieces of the puzzle to examine, and unsurprisingly, they still leave us with a lot of questions.

On one hand, Samsung just announced the ATIV S for Taiwan, and the manufacturer says that the phone won’t be arriving until 2013. On its surface, that would seem to support the theory that there’s a global delay facing the phone’s release, and multiple markets will have to wait until the new year to get their hands on the WP8 handset.

On the other hand, we might end up seeing at least some markets get the ATIV S this year, as Samsung Canada has been saying that, following missed plans for a November launch, it would make the ATIV S available to Canadian carriers in early-to-mid December.

That sounds very official, and now we’re definitely going to be on the lookout for this model actually arriving sometime in the next couple weeks. With so much confusion over the ATIV S still in the air, though, we really wish Samsung would take a moment to make it clear just who’s getting the WP8 smartphone, and when.

Source: ePrice, MobileSyrup
Via: Unwired View

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!