Microsoft Patent Reveals Its Own Project-Glass-Like HMD

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Google’s Project Glass could be one of the company’s biggest rolls of the dice in the field of personal electronics to date. The developers-only Google Glass Explorer Edition should be arriving early next year, and maybe by then we’ll finally start getting a sense for if there’s a real product under all this, or if it’s going to stagnate as little more than an expensive toy. Apparently, Google’s not the only one with its eye on this kind of head-mounted display (no pun intended), and a recent patent filing reveals Microsoft’s been working on a similar system.

From the sound of things, Microsoft has been developing the idea for its own glasses display with a much more limited scope in mind. The patent application describes these glasses specifically being used in conjunction with live events, especially sports, where the glasses could provide fans with additional info on the game. With capabilities like displaying instant replays, it’s clear from Microsoft’s description that the hardware would be able to do a lot more than just what’s described in the patent, which makes us a bit curious why the company would limit itself so much.

Perhaps it’s concerned about cost; we know the Project Glass dev units are running $1500, so maybe Microsoft wants something where the cost would be footed by the owners of arenas and theaters, rather than the public itself. Still, there’s definitely the groundwork here for an augmented reality system that would work hand-in-hand with Windows Phone, should Microsoft ever consider going down that path.

Source: USPTO
Via: The Droid Guy

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!