AT&T Spills Launch Details For HTC One X+, HTC One VX

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We just heard from HTC about the fate of Jelly Bean updates for a number of its Android smartphones. While the outlook isn’t sunny for all of them, the company’s very latest handsets should be on-track for seeing Android 4.1 updates. Those confirmed to make the leap to Jelly Bean include the One X+ and the One VX, which we’ve known for some time now would be finding homes at AT&T in the States. Today, AT&T gives us the rest of the story on just how this pair will arrive, with sales starting this Friday, November 16.

We’ve taken some time to go hands-on with both of these phones, and largely like what we’ve seen. While the One X+ doesn’t address every last concern we had with the original One X, it definitely shows the manufacturer stepping up its game a bit, and the One X+ feels noticeably faster than its predecessor. The One VX, as a mid-range device, is a little less impressive overall, but it’s still got some solid hardware, and knowing that it’s confirmed to get Jelly Bean is a big plus.

AT&T will sell the One X+ for just about $200 on-contract. The One VX can be had for considerably less, with a price tag of nearly $50 on-contract. The One X+ runs a 1.7GHz Tegra 3, has a 4.7-inch 720p screen, and offers 64GB of internal storage. The One VX has a dual-core Snapdragon S4, a 4.5-inch qHD display, and supports microSD for storage expansion. If you don’t want to wait until Friday, pre-orders for the One X+ open as of tomorrow.

Source: AT&T
Via: Engadget

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!