Google Exec Thinks Carriers Should Be Adding More Bloat To Android

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Android customization has always been a contentious issue. Some users want nothing more than the pure, unadulterated AOSP experience from their phones. Others might take a fancy to an OEM’s custom UI, and we’ve definitely seen some impressive stuff from the likes of HTC and Samsung. The one thing that hopefully we all can agree on is that carrier-imposed bloat is just tacky and awful. You might think that the only people who believe such things are a good idea are the carriers themselves, but one of the early minds behind Android has just offered his own two cents on the issue, and he thinks that carriers should be building even MORE bloat into our phones.

Rich Miner co-founded Android, Inc., later acquired by Google, where Miner now works in its venture capital division. While speaking at the Open Mobile Summit, he discussed his feelings that carriers aren’t going far enough to customize their Android devices. Even with all the bloat we already have on our phones, Miner describes carriers’ lack of implementing even more intrusive customization as “a big opportunity that they seem to have left on the table”.

Eww.

Miner was clearly speaking with his audience in mind, but as individual Android users, we want our carriers having as little to do with our phones as possible. Just keep the towers running, and we’re happy.

Source: Fierce Mobile Content
Via: BGR

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!