AT&T Announces Budget-Priced Samsung Galaxy Express, But Is It Cheap Enough?

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Samsung’s Galaxy Express has been a long time coming. We first caught wind of the name all the way back in March, but didn’t have much of an idea what Samsung would end up doing with it. The story on the phone started coming together in September, when AT&T mentioned that the Galaxy Express would be among several new Samsung Androids coming to the carrier over the next several months. October passed without the Galaxy Express popping-up back on our radar, but now today AT&T finally comes forward with the full story on the phone, announcing the start of sales on November 16.

Make no mistake: this is a budget-priced phone with the hardware to match. Still, mid-range devices like this have come a long way in recent months, and the Galaxy Express sounds like it has some decent hardware. The phone is powered by a 1.5GHz dual-core Snapdragon S4 SoC, has a big 4.5-inch Super AMOLED display, supports NFC, and runs Ice Cream Sandwich. The only major downside there is that the screen’s only in a WVGA resolution.

For all that, you’ll have to pay just about $100 on-contract. While that’s not a very surprising price for a phone like this, we still wonder if it’s a bit high. Considering that you can get the Lumia 920 for the same amount, and we regularly see the Galaxy S III discounted down to the $100 range, AT&T might have been wiser to introduce the Galaxy Express for either $50 or even free-on-contract.

Source: AT&T

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!