Google Wallet Introducing Physical Card For Users/Retailers Without NFC?

Advertisement

Last month, we caught wind of something big happening over at Google Wallet, but it wasn’t yet clear just what was going on. The site seemed to suggest that the service would soon become available to iPhone users, as well as smartphone owners on other platforms, though we remained in the dark as to just how this would work with phones that lacked NFC abilities. We’re still not sure if this is exactly what Google was talking about, but some leaked info from an unreleased Google Wallet app seems to suggest that Google could be introducing a physical Google Wallet credit card, linked to your Google Wallet account.

Screenshots from the leaked app reveal that the card would function just like a regular credit card, accepted at retailers lacking the NFC payment terminals needed to currently use Google Wallet on compatible Android phones.

The app makes a decent case for why this might be a great idea; you could link several credit cards to your Google Wallet card, so you’d have less to actually carry around. Then, if you ever lose or have the card stolen, you can cancel the Google Wallet card while leaving all your credit cards active.

In addition to support for the new card, the app introduces some new account management tools, letting you add or withdraw money from your Wallet account, as well as introducing the ability to transfer funds to other users. There’s even support for linking-up mass transit cards. Suffice it to say, we’re anxiously looking forward to the day when this new version of Wallet goes live, and Google starts distributing these Google Wallet cards to interested users.

Source: Android Police

Advertisement

What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!