Nexus 10 Finally Pictured, Specs Include A15-Based Exynos 5

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We only got our first real idea at how the Nexus 10 would appear yesterday, upon the leak of the tablet’s quick start guide containing a line drawing of the device. Things are moving fast for the Nexus 10, and today we finally get to see some actual pictures of the tablet, as well as get a better idea of its hardware and capabilities.

While the bulging edges seem a little less pronounced here than they looked in the manual, there’s no doubt that this is the same device. It’s got that pair of stereo speakers along its short edges, like we saw, as well as the same rear layout, complete with Samsung logo.

The specs being provided by the source of these images, some of which are backed-up by a separate discovery of Nexus 10 benchmark data, are absolutely astounding. We had heard the tablet would feature a super-high-res 2560 x 1600 10.1-inch display, which is looking confirmed.

The Nexus 10 should be the first smartphone or tablet to arrive with a new Exynos 5 SoC. While that’s only a dual-core component, it marks the step up from chips built around Cortex A9 cores to the newer A15 design, which should offer some huge performance benefits. In addition to that, the Mali-T604 should give the tablet some exceptional graphics power, taking full advantage of the tablet’s high resolution.

Further specs include 2GB of RAM, a five-megapixel main camera, and support for NFC. The Nexus 10 will supposedly arrive running Android 4.2, which may keep the Jelly Bean moniker.

Source: BriefMobile, GLBenchmark
Via: Unwired View

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!