iOS Developers Tried To Warn Apple About Maps Problems

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When Apple released iOS 6 along with its disappointing new Maps app, we were prepared to make some degree of adjustment. After all, it was no secret that Apple was ditching Google for its own map data sources, and beta releases of iOS 6 had already been available to the developer community for weeks and weeks. If they could all see the same problems we noticed upon iOS 6 Maps finally going public, why didn’t they warn Apple so something could be done about them? According to a number of developers, speaking anonymously about their experiences with iOS 6 beta, they had been pointing out these flaws over and over, but their complaints seemed to fall on deaf ears.

CNET spoke to half a dozen iOS devs, who recalled the numerous message board posts they’d leave documenting the failures of the new Maps in detail. They also filed bug reports, and tried emailing Apple employees directly. One of the few responses received regarding a complaint acknowledged that Apple was well aware of these issues, but that doesn’t seem to have affected its plans to launch the new Maps any. By and large, though, developers say that Apple wasn’t responding to these type of bug reports, leaving devs that relied on mapping data frustrated and confused.

There are a couple ways to look at this report. By this point, it was likely too late for Apple to change anything, so maybe it saw these kind of complaints as an inevitability not even worth addressing. Maybe individual employees sympathized with developer frustrations, but had no choice but to toe the company line and commit wholeheartedly to the new Maps. Still, a little more open communication would have been nice.

Source: CNET
Via: BGR

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!