Google Delivers Android 4.1.2 Factory Images, Changes Get Detailed

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Yesterday, Google released Android 4.1.2 to the AOSP, and we heard about the initial arrival of updates for Nexus 7 hardware. Since then, Google’s continued with the Android 4.1.2 roll-out, delivering factory images and binary files for the Nexus 7 and the GSM Galaxy Nexus.

As shouldn’t be too much of a surprise, the same files for the CDMA Galaxy Nexus aren’t yet available. We’re also still waiting on those for the Nexus S, but feel a little better about the chances of seeing those soon.

Shortly after reporting on the release of Android 4.1.2 yesterday we got to see the lengthy changelog associated with the build, and now that users have gotten some time to check out all these new features themselves, we’re getting a better sense of what to expect.

Like we mentioned, the launcher now supports homescreen rotation. There are also some changes to expandable notifications, letting you access their content with a single finger, rather than a two-finger gesture. Lengthy SMS messages no longer automatically convert to MMS messages, Location Services gets rebranded and adds a convenient “stop all access” switch, and there’s a new bug report feature to generate reports developers could find useful in troubleshooting obscure problems. There’s also a new look to the touch response from the on-screen Android buttons, with a more consistent shade of gray and a bit of a halo effect.

Source: Google, Android Police

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!