HTC Announces Windows Phone 8X and 8S, Its First Windows Phone 8 Models

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HTC CEO Peter Chou, alongside Microsoft’s Steve Ballmer, took to the stage at HTC’s New York City event this morning to announce the company’s latest hardware. It’s been cooking up its first batch of Windows Phone 8 devices, and today shared the results with us, the Windows Phone 8X and 8S by HTC.

Both phones will go up for sale this November, coming to carriers that include AT&T, Verizon, and T-Mobile.

The 8S (above) runs a dual-core Snapdragon S4, has a four-inch WVGA display, 512MB of RAM, and a five-megapixel main camera with f/2.8 aperture. The phone’s design is supposed to reflect the look of Windows Phone 8’s live tiles. HTC gives it only 4GB of storage, but expansion’s available via microSD. The 8S is 10.28 millimeters thick and weighs 113 grams.

The 8X (below) goes with a more powerful 1.5GHz S4, and a larger, 4.3-inch 720p HD display. It also gets an eight-megapixel main camera, and its front-facer is outfitted with a special wide angle lens, letting the camera capture a whole group trying to video chat at once. There’s 16GB of flash for on-board storage, as well as a gigabyte of RAM.  The 8X measures 10.12mm thick and weighs 130g.

Both models feature Beats Audio technology, which HTC had previously employed in its Android lineup. There’s also Gorilla Glass on each of these handsets, helping to protect their displays.

HTC’s color options for the 8S.

Source: HTC
Via: The Verge

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!