Smartphones And Tablets At Center Of Cross-Platform Advertising Strategies

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Companies that rely on advertising have had to make some big changes in recent years, shifting their focus as we spend less and less time watching TV or listening to radio the old-fashioned way, and more time consuming media on our computers and mobile devices. On the flip side, the ability to track users and deliver targeted advertisements presents all new opportunities to maximize advertising potential. Some advertisers are looking to embrace this new technology in a way that leverages how a really plugged-in viewer will sometimes be exposing themselves to advertising on multiple devices simultaneously; MTV has just such a system in place that promises new-found advertisement synergy.

MTV’s Reverb platform is all about getting its advertisers’ messages to you no matter how you’re getting your MTV content. Tonight MTV airs its Video Music Awards. Pepsi will be running heavy promotions during the program, but maybe you sort of zone-out during commercial breaks and pull out your laptop or smartphone to kill the time. With Reverb, those Pepsi ads will be synchronized across MTV’s platforms, so even if you’re not paying attention to the ad on TV, there will simultaneously be a Pepsi ad running on MTV’s website, and in the company’s companion app, Watch With.

As far as new advertising techniques go, this is definitely one of the less creepy ones, and it really makes a lot of sense. Assuming MTV sees success with it, we wouldn’t be surprised to see more of this kind of synchronized promotion.

Source: WSJ

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!