Black Galaxy S III Confirmed By UK Retailer, Gets Release Window

Advertisement

We heard over the weekend that Samsung may be planning to release a new black version of its hugely successful Galaxy S III. The information appeared to come from a retailer’s computer systems, and while everything looked legit, it didn’t really tell us anything more than that an SKU existed for this color option. While we’re still not hearing anything from Samsung, another retailer has now spoken out about the black GS3, and has given us an idea of when to expect the phone to arrive.

Now that the cat’s out of the bag, MobileFun has posted an announcement of the black GS3 to its blog. According to the site, the black GS3 will cost the same as the blue and white versions already available, and will be ready to ship in four to six weeks. That seems like a long time to wait (and encroaching upon iPhone 5 territory), but at least it should get here before October.

We wondered earlier if the black GS3 might present the opportunity for Samsung to release the phone’s official Jelly Bean update. According to MobileFun, the phone will still be on Ice Cream Sandwich when it arrives; the site even goes so far as to recommend flashing a custom JB ROM if you’re not happy with the default software. It’s not clear just how much information the site has on the black GS3, and how much might be assumption, so we’re still holding out hope that the GS3’s JB will arrive on or before the time this black variant launches.

Source: MobileFun.co.uk
Via: Android Police

Advertisement

What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!