iOS 6 Simulator Reveals UI Changes For New, Taller iPhone 5 Display

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There’s a mountain of evidence piling up to suggest that the next iPhone will feature a taller display than the lineup has used before; in all the leaks of supposed iPhone 5 components, the presence of a larger screen (or, at least, the hole for it) has been consistent. As it turns out, some iOS 6 behavior also seems to reinforce the notion that just such a larger screen, with a new resolution to match, will soon be coming to Apple hardware.

The Apple enthusiasts over at 9to5 Mac fired up Apple’s iOS Simulator from the company’s dev tools, tweaking the settings to run on a hypothetical device with a 640 x 1136 resolution – the very same predicted for the iPhone 5. When you run iOS 5 on that kind of simulated hardware, the software places gaps between the four rows of apps on the home screen to make them better fit the space. On iOS 6, on the other hand, the system seems better aware of how to take advantage of that extra space and adds a fifth row of icons, instead.

Some further experimentation revealed that this behavior only seems to occur with precisely those 640 x 1136 figures, adding even more credence to the claims that the iPhone 5’s screen will arrive a screen of just that resolution. It’s a bit less than absolute proof, but we’re happy to add it to the collection of circumstantial finds that keeps getting harder and harder to ignore.

Source: 9to5 Mac

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!