Adobe Flash Still Runs On Jelly Bean, With A Little Work

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Last fall, Adobe decided to read the writing on the wall and give up on Flash for mobile devices. This was just before Ice Cream Sandwich came out, though, and realizing that users would need some time to acclimate to the lack of Flash in their future, it gracefully decided to extend official support to Android 4.0. Since then, we’ve seen some minor bugfix and security updates, but upon news of Google releasing Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, Adobe finally put an end to its continued Flash support. As it turns out, there’s nothing about Jelly Bean that directly prevents Flash from still running, so with a little fiddling around, you can keep using it even with this latest Android build.

The easy part is getting Flash onto your Jelly Bean device. While you won’t find it in the Play store, sideloading its APK is still pretty darn simple. Of course, that’s only part of the equation, and if you want to view Flash content in web pages, you’ll need a browser that supports Adobe’s plugin.

The problem with Jelly Bean is that Google’s now moved on to Chrome, which doesn’t want anything to do with Flash. Here, there are a few options; you could manually install the old Android Browser, and set all its permissions yourself, or you could install a third-party browser like Firefox that still supports plugins.

With some users intent on still having access to Flash, despite Adobe’s position, we wonder just how far into the future we’ll see this existing Flash code shoehorned into subsequent Android versions.

Source: XDA-Developers

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!