Did Apple Go Too Far In Warning Retailers Against Samsung Sales?

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If you’ve been following the most recent developments in the legal shoving match taking place between Apple and Samsung, you’re no doubt aware of the recent success Apple’s seen in having preliminary injunctions against certain Samsung models granted. Sure, the Galaxy Nexus injunction was later given a temporary stay, but Apple must be feeling pretty confident about its position. To that end, it’s just come to light that Apple decided to take matters into its own hands, and has been directly contacting retailers and carriers who do business with Samsung to warn them not to sell the Galaxy Tab 10.1 nor Galaxy Nexus, lest they face legal consequences themselves. Did Apple cross a line in doing so?

As far as Samsung’s concerned, the injunctions prevent it from importing the relevant models, and providing them to its partners, but shouldn’t keep retailers who already have these models on their shelves from continuing to sell on-hand stock. For now, it’s a moot point for the Nexus, at least, but Samsung is still angry at Apple for making this kind of end-run.

Legally, the situation is a little less clear. The injunctions apply to “those acting in concert” with Samsung, prohibiting such parties from selling these products in the US. Does that apply to retailers? What about carriers? Those answers aren’t immediately clear, but with legal actions between the companies proceeding, this is far from the last we’ve heard of the situation.

Source: FOSS Patents
Via: Phandroid

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!