Google Has An Update On EVO 4G LTE Wallet Situation

Advertisement

Unlike most of the major US carriers, Sprint has no beef with Google Wallet at the moment, and empowers its users to take full advantage of their phones’ NFC hardware in order to make mobile payments through the service. At least, that’s the way things are supposed to work, but an issue with the HTC EVO 4G LTE has been keeping the phone from functioning properly with Wallet. We still don’t have an exact ETA for when a fix might become available, but Google’s helping us narrow things down a little, posting a note to the Google Play listing for Wallet that sheds some light on the situation.

Back when we talked about this issue in late June, we saw some signs that Sprint was aware of the situation, where EVO 4G LTE owners were being presented with Wallet errors explaining that the app wasn’t certified for use on their phones. We also heard that Google was looking into things on its end, and was hopeful that some sort of fix would be ready soon.

The Google Play store now explains that “Google Wallet will be unavailable on the EVO 4G until an OTA update in July“. We assume it means the EVO 4G LTE instead of 2010’s EVO 4G (with no NFC support).

This news makes it clear that the problem with the phone is a little more substantial than a simple tweak to Wallet itself could fix, and presumably HTC is nearly done preparing a firmware update to address the bug, assuming it’s not undergoing testing already. We’ve only got three weeks to go until the end of July, but hopefully Sprint and HTC will have things ready to go a little before then.

Source: Google
Via: Android Central

Advertisement

What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!