More High-Profile iPad Mini Rumors: When Will Production Start?

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Yesterday evening, we looked into some new rumors about the iPad Mini, Apple’s presumptive seven-something-inch tablet that may be arriving later this year. Like always, some of our readers regarded the news with distrust, doubting that Apple’s really working on such a device. A long time ago, we might be convinced to concur, but lately these iPad Mini rumors have been coming from more and more respected sources, giving us hope that there’s some real truth to them. The latest to come to our attention continues this trend, with The Wall Street Journal claiming knowledge about Apple’s plans to start iPad Mini production.

According to the WSJ’s sources, the usual “people familiar with the situation”, Apple’s manufacturing partners will begin production of the iPad Mini in September. They also describe the tablet’s screen size as below eight inches, without providing an exact figure, which fits with what we’ve been hearing.

This follows-up yesterday’s news from Bloomberg. While we’re still treating all this as rumor, we’re a lot more inclined to give credence to these theories put forth by the likes of Bloomberg and The Wall Street Journal, rather than, say, a source like Digitimes; in the case of the latter, there have just been too many misses to summon-up much faith.

Are you convinced about the iPad Mini yet, or do you think that even these new sources are getting their info wrong?

Source: WSJ
Via: BGR

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!