Nexus S 4G Gets Some AOSP Love, Now Fully Supported

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Owners of Nexus-series Androids might remember that back in February, Google revealed that CDMA-based models like the Galaxy Nexus on Verizon and the Nexus S 4G on Sprint wouldn’t be seeing full support through the Android Open Source Project. The problem was in the requirement for carrier-signed binaries for handling basic phone functionality, making it impossible to compile the full source for one of these handsets yourself. That was unfortunate news for devs hoping to do serious work on these models, but Google’s hands seemed tied. Today, Google announced a breakthrough towards improving the situation, providing CDMA and WiMAX binaries that enable full AOSP compatibility for the Nexus S 4G.

The source for these files still isn’t available, but the process through which APK signing works has been adapted to allow these binaries to be incorporated in standard AOSP builds. Essentially, the Nexus S 4G is now as flexible to develop on as the straight-up GSM Nexus S.

Unfortunately, the situation doesn’t look as hopeful for the Verizon Galaxy Nexus, which would still face a number of issues concerning camera, GPS, and NFC compatibility should Google attempt a similar solution. Ultimately, the effort required just might not be worth it, especially if it would still end up falling short of the quality expected from the GSM Galaxy Nexus.

Source: Google
Via: Android Poilce

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!