Nexus 7 Unboxing (Video)

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Android really needed a Nexus tablet. With the exception of the Transformer and Transformer Prime, all Android tablets so far have been pretty bad. We can say this because we’ve used them all (more or less). Whether it’s a laggy interface, poor app selection, or bad hardware, Android tablets are still miles behind in a race that Apple is unequivocally winning.

The Nexus 7 just might change that. It’s got Jelly Bean, an operating system that attempts to (and succeeds at) make Android lag a thing of the past. It offers a thin and light form factor only possible with a 7″ display. It brings forth the best of Google Play, in a direct jab at the Kindle Fire, by putting content front and center when you first turn on the Nexus 7. Oh, and it’s pretty cheap at just $199. Not a bad price for a quad-core tablet!

For us, one of the most exciting prospects of the Nexus 7 is that like all previous Nexus devices, it will enjoy a vibrant development story.

First impressions:
– The tablet isn’t exactly thin, but it feels fantastic in-hand thanks to the rubberized backing. Why don’t all tablets have dimpled backings that hide fingerprints?
– Typing in portrait is a joy thanks to the 7″ display!
– Display quality and clarity is so-so. Overall it looks a bit washed out, and you can definetly see pixels.
–  We quickly got a system software update after turning on the Nexus 7, which changed the look and feel of Google Play, plus changed the structure of the system settings. It also made things a bit faster.
–  The Nexus 7 is fast. Not like “DAMN-this-is-fast-as-hell!”, but definitely faster than any Android tablet that we’ve used. With ease it handled an ambush of input as we installed about a dozen apps and set up various accounts.

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About The Author
Brandon Miniman
Brandon is a graduate from the Villanova School of Business, located near Philadelphia, PA. He's been a technology writer since 2002, and, in 2005, became Editor-in-Chief of Pocketnow, a then Windows Mobile-focused website. He has since helped to transition Pocketnow into a top-tier smartphone and tablet publication. He's so obsessed with technology that he once entered a candle store and asked if they had a "new electronics" scent. They didn't.