Will WP8 Be Enough To Get Sprint Excited About Windows Phone?

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When it comes to Windows Phone devices, Sprint’s been what’s essentially a no-man’s-land. The presence of the HTC Arrive in the carrier’s lineup has let it maintain at least the public impression that it supports WP7, but it’s been no secret that the carrier is less than impressed with the platform and its prospects for smartphone sales. Comments made by Sprint execs had us thinking that the tide might turn with the release of Windows Phone 8, assuming that Microsoft was able to finally generate the level of enthusiasm for the OS that Sprint felt was lacking. Today, upon Microsoft finally unveiling WP8, Verizon, T-Mobile, and AT&T have all spoken-up with their support for the new platform, a sentiment that Sprint has so far failed to voice, offering a weak “no comment”-type response, instead; will it ever come around to Windows Phone?

To be fair, we’ve just begun to scratch the surface on WP8, so Sprint may understandably be planning on holding-off on any judgments regarding the platform until more information is available. That could include both details on WP8 hardware, as well as feedback from users regarding their experiences with it. That latter one’s going to be tricky, because if Sprint is really hoping to base its decisions on user enthusiasm, there’s the chance it may end up missing out on the WP8 launch.

Based on what Microsoft’s shared so far, we’re optimistic that it’s doing enough right with WP8 to eventually get Sprint to come around; we just wonder how long that will take.

Source: PC Magazine
Via: WMPoweruser

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!