Nokia Maps For Windows Phone 8 Features Rumored

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In the weeks leading up to Apple’s iOS 6 announcement, expectations were pretty high that the company would have an impressive new Maps app full of 3D content to share, and sure enough, Apple delivered. Rumors about the news may have played a role in prompting Google to announce its own mapping updates, including some very similar 3D content for Google Earth. That may leave you wondering what Microsoft has in store for Windows Phone 8 in order to remain competitive. One rumor adds to what we’ve heard about the company’s mapping strategy for the platform, and includes some 3D features of its own.

So far, we’ve heard bits and pieces about changes coming to Windows Phone 8, including how it would use its maps to keep users informed of the presence of nearby WiFi hotspots. We’ve also learned of the greater role Nokia has been playing in Windows Phone mapping, with the company moving to become the public face of Bing Maps. While discussing the iOS 6 announcement, WPCentral shares some of what it’s heard about WP8 and how maps will work.

Supposedly, by the time WP8 arrives Bing Maps will be gone entirely, fully replaced by Nokia Maps. The software is said to feature a 3D navigation mode, fully-accelerated by the system’s GPU hardware. While it’s not expected to be something so impressive as to lure users away from iOS or Android, it’s supposedly well-done enough to stand on its own in comparison.

Microsoft is holding its Windows Phone sneak peek event in just over a week, where we’ll possibly get a chance to learn more about mapping in WP8.

Source: WPCentral
Via: MobileSyrup

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!