Pandora Denies Teasing New Android Release: Big Misunderstanding

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A little earlier this week we learned about some benchmark figures that seemed like they might be confirming the Google/ASUS tablet project we had already heard rumored. That device appeared to be running Android 4.1, and with a build code that suggested this could be the version Google releases as Android Jelly Bean (as opposed to jumping all the way to Android 5.0). That’s fueling some speculation that we could see this next major Android revision land as soon as this summer. If you’ve been keeping an eye out for further evidence of such a release, Pandora just updated its Android app, with its release notes implying that the company was getting it ready for the next Android to drop. As it turns out, Pandora doesn’t have any advance knowledge of a pending release, and this is just a matter of reading too much into things.

The changelog for the latest Pandora app initially included mention of “Compatibility support for upcoming Android OS.” With wording like that, we can easily understand how it could be read that to imply that Pandora has knowledge of forthcoming changes to Android, and maybe even the timetable by which they’d arrive.

According to Pandora, which has since removed that line from the app’s release notes, there’s nothing so interesting behind that statement. Instead, the app had been coded at first to expect to be running on certain Android versions, and this is just a small re-write to let it gracefully work on any future Android release, instead of a change made to comply with something specific to Android 4.1.

We’ll just have to keep looking elsewhere for any juicy rumors about the next Android release.

Source: Pandora (Google Play), Android Central

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!