What’s This T699 Samsung 720p Android For T-Mobile?

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After wondering for months what Samsung’s SGH-T999 Android for T-Mobile might be, we recently started considering that it could represent the carrier’s version of the Galaxy S III. That’s far from confirmed at the moment, but it certainly seems like a decent possibility, considering both that we were expecting T999 to be quite the high-end device, and how it showed-up grouped with other GS3 models in a recent video. Even if we can cross that mystery off our lists, we’re far from done with identifying unknown phones, as some new evidence shows another similar model in the works.

Once again, we’re looking at a Samsung-made Android for T-Mobile, and one with a 720p display, at that. Model SGH-T699 features in a User Agent Profile on Samsung’s site. The document dates back to February, but we’re not sure when Samsung first published it. While that model number gets quite a few hits in searches, it appears the majority are related to typos and confusion with the T669 Gravity Touch messaging phone.

So, if it’s not the GS3, what might the T699 actually be? TmoNews has raised the theory that it might be a carrier-branded version of the Galaxy Nexus, and while the recent release of Sprint’s GNex might make the case that carriers are still interested in the aging handset, it strikes us as odd to have a special T-Mobile edition of the phone when the international version already supports the requisite bands.

Any guesses what Samsung and T-Mobile might be cooking-up here?

Source: Samsung (XML)
Via: TmoNews

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!