Apple Begins iOS 5.1.1 Distribution, Bug Fixes On Their Way

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Two months ago, Apple dropped iOS 5.1 upon us, heralding the arrival of changes for Camera, power management fixes for the iPhone 4S, and some smaller bugfixes. Today, Apple’s got its follow-up effort ready to go, and while it doesn’t contain quite as heavy a collection of changes as iOS 5.1 did, iOS 5.1.1 continues with the housekeeping as it delivers its own set of bugfixes.

If you had been experience trouble streaming video over AirPlay, 5.1.1 has a fix that should help get things running smoothly. Issues with syncing both Safari bookmarks and the browser’s Reading List should similarly now be resolved.

Apple continues its work on the Camera changes introduced in 5.1, now improving the functionality of HDR mode when you go to take a picture straight from the lock screen.

Data connectivity for the 2012 iPad gets some attention, with a change that should remedy any issues that might come up switching between 3G and 2G networks when necessary. Unfortunately, there doesn’t seem to be any fix this time around for the tablet’s spotty WiFi behavior; shortly after the its debut, we started hearing reports from owners that the new iPad was having a hard time maintaining a good WiFi connection.

Finally, the App Store gets a small fix, correcting errant “unable to purchase” messages even after an app has already been bought.

We wonder what if Apple also managed to fix any of the exploits being investigated for use in a 5.1 jailbreak; as far as we know, details of those remain private.

Source: Phone Dog

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!