LTE PlayBook To See Processor Upgrade, NFC Support?

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Almost since RIM first released the BlackBerry PlayBook tablet, we’ve been hearing rumors about a new version that would introduce its own cellular modem, no longer relying on a tethered BlackBerry smartphone in order to get online while on the go. Such devices have popped-up in numerous leaked roadmaps, suggesting we’d end up seeing both an HSPA+ and LTE version of this tablet refresh. About a month ago, we got what may have been our first real look at one of these devices, showing-off the telltale sign of a SIM tray. Today, amidst all the other BlackBerry new that’s floating about, there’s a new leak out concerning these new PlayBooks, and just what hardware they may be packing.

This information comes from a slide supposedly shown at a BlackBerry World breakfast event earlier today. While it only appears to address the LTE PlayBook directly, assuming that the HSPA+ version is still in the works, we’d guess that this same information would apply. According to the slide, RIM would be moving from the 1GHz dual-core OMAP 4 in current-gen PlayBooks to a new dual-core 1.5GHz component. That would likely mean a new GPU, as well, but we don’t have the details on that just yet. Beyond the processor bump, the new tablet would also support NFC, which we’ve been seeing RIM more publicly embrace lately.

As far as we know, this applies to new versions of the seven-inch PlayBook, though we’ve also heard about the possibility for a ten-inch LTE version for later this year.

lte pb slide

Source: Canadian Reviewer

Via: phoneArena

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!