LG Denies Windows Phone Reports, But Just What Was Incorrect?

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Yesterday, we heard that LG was planning to put Windows Phone on the back-burner, not release any new hardware in the foreseeable future, and continue to work with the platform only as an internal R&D project. This news was reported by the Korea Herald, attributed to an unnamed LG spokesperson. Since then, though, another spokesperson for LG has been in touch with Pocket-lint, and steadfastly denies those earlier claims. Does that mean that LG plans to keep at it with Windows Phone, or is there more to this apparent about-face?

LG says of the report that “none of it is true” and dismisses it as speculation. Except, the Korea Times expressly attributed its claims to that aforementioned spokesperson; it may be lying, a serious accusation on its own, but it sure doesn’t sound like any sort of straight-up speculation on its own.

The company continued, saying, “We are still on board with Windows Phone, but right now, we’re focusing on Android because that’s where the demand is.” We could split hairs over whether or not “still on board” covers the low-key research we mentioned, but this honestly sounds like exactly the same story. Yesterday’s report never claimed LG was done with Windows Phone for good, so it’s very difficult to understand where LG is now coming from with its position that absolutely nothing from that story was true.

This is all likely a moot point, since based on reader comments from yesterday, not many of you are too sore to see LG leave, or at least fade into the shadows of the Windows Phone game. Still, we can’t help but think that LG’s protestations today have very little to do with correcting any misunderstandings, and more to do with just wanting to control the story.

Source: Pocket-lint

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!