LG Distancing Itself From Windows Phone; Don’t Expect New Models

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Just a few months after Windows Phone 7 launched as a platform, we heard LG talking in January 2011 about its disappointments up until then with sales of the Optimus 7 and Quantum. Granted, things were just getting started for WP7, but even with that in consideration, LG just wasn’t seeing the sales that it had projected. While this early reaction didn’t bode well for the company’s relationship with the OS, LG seemed at the time that it still wanted Windows Phone to succeed, and that it would give the situation a chance to improve. Now, well over a year later, it seems that LG’s patience has finally run its course, and the company has revealed that it will distance itself from Windows Phone in the immediate future, focusing its efforts on Android, instead.

LG doesn’t discount the possibility of ever producing Windows Phone gear again, and it will keep engineers working on research and development on the platform. As far as consumer devices go, however, LG still doesn’t see a market where sales figures are high enough to warrant the expense and effort of introducing a new Windows Phone model.

We’d been following LG’s work on unreleased models like the Windows Phone-powered Miracle, but it appears that the company’s just going to be shelving any in-development projects that had been underway.

We can understand LG’s concern with the current viability of the Windows Phone ecosystem, but it will still be a shame to have one fewer manufacturer working on the platform; the Jil Sander phone was one of the sharpest WP7 models in recent memory.

Source: The Korea Herald

Via: WPCentral

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!