Custom HTC Chip Could Signal Renewed Interest in Low-End Phones

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Three months ago, HTC went on-record with some of its plans for the future, indicating a desire to focus on producing fewer, higher-end phones and to move away from having so many low- and mid-range phones clouding its lineup. That sounded like it had the potential to be a smart move for HTC, and we waited to hear about all these upcoming flagship-level smartphones. The announcement of the One-series seemed like a step in the right direction, but we’ve also been hearing about models like the HTC Golf, which sounds exactly like the type of handset HTC had said it would be avoiding. Just what’s going on with those plans, after all? Now some further signs have emerged that HTC may have had a change of heart since its announcement, revealing work on a new processor for even more low-end phones.

As the China Times tells it, HTC is getting in bed with ST-Ericsson with the aim of designing a SoC for use in lower-end smartphones. Just like Samsung has its own Exynos chips at its disposal, so too would HTC end up with its own, branded processor. The report doesn’t discount the possibility for HTC and ST-Ericsson developing chips with higher-end devices in mind at some point in the future, but notes that this initial effort would be producing hardware for more budget-priced smartphones.

If this news is true, and HTC will be working on lower-end phones for some time to come, is that necessarily a bad thing? Even if HTC wants to cover more of the market, can it maybe do so without spreading itself too, too thin, especially now that it’s aware of past failures in that department?

Source: China Times (Google Translate)

Via: Unwired View

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!