Here’s How The ASUS Transformer Prime GPS-Fixing Dongle Looks

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Shortly after ASUS released its quad-core Transformer Prime tablet, users began noticing some really disappointing performance by the model’s GPS receiver, struggling to lock-on to satellites and get a fix on its location. The problem sounded like a fundamental design problem with the GPS antenna obscured by the Prime’s metal casing, but ASUS still attempted to make things right with a software fix. That release tried to speed locks by sending some satellite data to the tablet over its data connection, but owners still weren’t satisfied with the poor performance. ASUS finally realized it needed a hardware solution after all, and we heard earlier this month that it would release an external GPS dongle to fix this issue once and for all. Today, we get our first look at just how that dongle will arrive.

When we say “GPS dongle” we’re not talking about a small receiver on the end of a long USB cord, like laptop owners once used. Instead, this ASUS part looks more like a micro-dock of sorts, snapping onto the tablet’s 40-pin connector. It’s broad, kind of bulky, and we’re not sure it’s the solution everyone was hoping for. You can forget about using it alongside any case that’s already been released. Then again, if you must have GPS reception, this should do the trick, and we hear it’s quite sturdy and stays put on the tablet well.

ASUS should be announcing the dongle sometime today, including how Transformer Prime owners can get it for free.

Source: Land of Droid

Via: Android Central

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!