HTC One V Unibody Design Pays Legend Homage

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HTC christened its new series of HTC One Androids today with the announcements of the One X, One S, and One V. While the X and S are arguably the stars of the show, especially with the One X and its quad-core performance, the One V still managed to make a strong showing as the smaller, budget-targeted alternative.

The One V is crafted from a block of aluminum, just like the classic HTC Legend with which it shares many design cues. We’ve got the same large, angled base, only we’ve lost the Legend’s optical mouse, leaving it looking a bit sparse. HTC’s also cut back on the number of Android buttons for the One V, matching the three on the One X and S, but the models are still quite similar. While the Legend only had a 3.2-inch display, the One V bumps things up to 3.7-inches, and while that’s just in a WVGA resolution, the screen reportedly looks quite impressive.

Instead of the eight-megapixel sensor the One X and S share, the V gets a five-megapixel component. Even with that downgrade, you should still look forward to the imaging features we just discussed, as the V includes the same image processing chip as its bigger brothers.

The remaining hardware specs of the One V betray its lower-end design. Look for a 1GHz single-core processor, 512MB of RAM, and 4GB of internal flash. The phone should come out sometime in Q2, but details aren’t yet available.

Source: HTC

Via: The Verge, BGR, Engadget

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!