Motorola Android-Powered Cordless Phone Spotted At FCC

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Just after Christmas, we heard about an unusual Android handset Archos was working on, which was neither traditional smartphone nor personal media player, but instead a home cordless telephone running the smartphone OS. There’s some more of the same sort of thing to look at today, but from a different manufacturer. We’ve already experienced Motorola thinking outside the traditional smartphone box with products like its MOTOACTV smartwatch, so it should be little surprise to see the company come up with an Android-powered cordless phone of its own, which just took a swing past the FCC.

Motorola models HS1101 and MBP2000PU have the same hardware and software, and differ only in their packaging. The phone features a 3.2-inch low-resolution 400 x 240 display, which is probably not going to make it a smart choice for watching any kind of media, but should be functional enough for the phone’s software. That includes things like an answering machine app, but this isn’t some locked-down Android that only runs phone apps; you’ve got all the basics, like the Android browser, and can install additional apps either through the SlideME market or by sideloading.

We’re still missing some of the hardware picture, but we wouldn’t expect the phone to be hiding a powerhouse processor within. Data connectivity is over WiFi, and like the Archos we looked at, this Motorola uses the DECT standard for its voice traffic back to the basestation. There’s no word yet on its release plans.

Source: FCC

Via: Engadget

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!