Verizon Looks Ready With an Update For The Motorola Droid R2-D2

Advertisement

It’s been quite a while since we’ve talked about Motorola’s Droid 2 R2-D2 edition. In the eighteen-some months since the phone’s release, we’ve seen plenty of more modern Droid models come out, but if you’re still running down that two-year contract you signed when picking up the R2-D2, and have been holding onto the aging handset all this time, we’ve got some good news to show you that Motorola hasn’t forgotten about you just yet; a new support page up on Verizon’s site foretells the coming arrival of a new update for the Android.

Hopefully you’ve divorced yourself by now from the notion of ever seeing an official Ice Cream Sandwich come down through Verizon. The update we’re looking today, bringing the phone up to system software 4.5.622.A957, is very much in bugfix/maintenance territory. Just what changes will it bring?

There are plenty of little tweaks that should be delivering improved performance in one way or another, including those targeting the phone’s WiFi hotspot mode. Bugfixes look to correct problems with power cycling, fix Gmail access while using the hotspot, and help with an issue that would cause the phone to become unstable when repeatedly sliding its keyboard open and closed.

Beyond all the improvements and fixes, there are updates to a couple Verizon apps waiting for you, too. Knowing Verizon, having this document up on it site means that Droid 2 R2-D2 owners should be seeing this update start going out in the next several days to a week.

Source: Verizon

Via: Droid-life

Share This Post
Advertisement
What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!