Humble Bundle 2 Lets You Name Your Own Prices For Games

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The Humble Bundle is an interesting idea for game sales and distribution that came into being a couple years ago. Developers of independent games get together to offer users a package of several of their titles, sold together as one. What makes things interesting is that the Humble Bundle lets you pay whatever you want for group. More so than that, you can specify a portion of the purchase price to go to charity, and you have direct control over just what fraction goes to good causes. The first Humble Bundle for Android was announced right at the start of 2012; if you missed-out on that opportunity, the second has just arrived, and it will be available for the next two weeks.

The games included in this Humble Bundle may not be brand new titles, as they’ve already been released on other platforms, but their Android ports are all new. The core group of four games making up the Bundle are Canabalt, Cogs, Avadon: The Black Fortress, and Zen Bound 2. The final title is available as a reward for being extra generous with your payment. To help encourage users not to low-ball things too much, the Humble Bundle will include Swords & Soldiers, but only if you pay above the current average purchase price. Right now, that’s at six dollars, but expect to see it keep moving around (likely higher).

Just because this Humble Bundle is for Android doesn’t mean you’ll be stuck gaming on the small screen – all titles are cross-platform, and you’ll be able to play them from Mac, Windows, and Linux PCs. The Bundle is available from now through April 2.

Source: Humble Bundle

Via: Android and Me

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!