Where’s Verizon’s LTE Windows Phone Handset?

Advertisement

With the announcement of the Nokia Lumia 900, the stage is now set for the first LTE-capable Windows Phone device to launch on AT&T in the United States. That’s a bit of a coup for AT&T, especially as it continues to introduce subscribers to its brand-new LTE service. Of course, Verizon’s been going strong with LTE for over a year now; surely it must also have its sights on augmenting its lineup with an LTE Windows Phone handset? A rumor out this morning says it won’t be anytime soon, and that after a canceled venture with Nokia into bringing one of its phones to the carrier, Verizon has decided to wait on LTE until Windows Phone 8.

Supposedly, Verizon had been working with Nokia to launch a Windows Phone we know only by its codename Om. We’re not sure if this would have been based on any existing Lumia models, or if it would have had a distinct identity. The plan was to introduce the Om in January, but apparently Verizon had its heart set on an LTE-capable model, and the software support just wasn’t there at the time. Not wanting another 3G phone while it still has the Trophy, Verizon just decided to go without.

Now that AT&T’s getting the 900, and LTE on Windows Phone becoming a reality, will Verizon rethink the prospects for a Nokia-made LTE handset on its network? The sources behind today’s rumor say that Verizon is still interested, but will likely wait until Windows Phone 8 arrives. If you’re looking for high-speed Windows Phone data in the interim, it’s looking like AT&T is the place to be.

Source: The Verge

Advertisement
What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!