Will Existing Windows Phone Handsets Make The Trip To WP8?

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One of the things we’re looking forward to for Windows Phone 8 is that, despite having a new kernel which no longer relies on Windows CE code, it’s supposed to be backwards-compatible with existing apps. That’s hugely important, since Microsoft can’t risk alienating its already small user base if the apps they’ve already bought just stop working someday. There’s another big issue when it comes to backwards compatibility and Windows Phone 8, and one we haven’t heard strong support for one way or the other; Mary-Jo Foley recently started thinking about the chances for Microsoft to deliver WP8 as an update to existing handsets, and based on some carefully-worded statements from Microsoft personnel, she argues it’s not looking good.

Foley cites comments made by a Microsoft VP at the Mobile World Congress earlier this week, where he deftly avoided addressing the issue of hardware compatibility and instead replied to a question in terms of app compatibility. It’s this sort of thing, Foley argues, that we can likely read in to in order to divine Microsoft’s intentions (she similarly looks to the company’s obfuscated denial of iOS Office rumors as actually supporting the news).

This would be sad news if true, especially for owners of newer Windows Phone hardware, but it wouldn’t be entirely uncharacteristic of Microsoft. Would you put-off buying a new Windows Phone handset until learning more about the veracity of this rumor?

Source: ZDNet

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!