HTC One X (XL?) Swings By FCC With AT&T LTE Bands

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After hearing about HTC’s first quad-core phone for months and months, HTC finally announced the device at the Mobile World Congress, officially revealing the HTC One X as the highlight of its new One-series of Androids. We learned that HTC planned to launch the phone in the US on AT&T and its new LTE network. Today we see the FCC publish certification documentation for a new HTC smartphone, and it looks like it just might be the One X.

Now, to be fair, there’s still a little uncertainty about how the phone will be named. From HTC, we keep hearing about the One X, which features a quad-core Tegra 3. However, the company has revealed that the version of the phone that will run on LTE networks, including AT&T’s in the States, will only feature a dual-core processor. Publicly, HTC’s been referring to this as a dual-core One X, but the company’s website suggests that this LTE version is a fully-distinct model, the One XL. We don’t know if the company’s going to keep using the two names largely interchangeably, but that seems to be the case thus far.

Dual-core One X or One XL, whatever hit the FCC today is definitely on its way to AT&T. Besides the standard voice and 3G frequencies for phones running on the carrier, there’s support for LTE bands 4 and 17, the 700MHz and 1700MHz ranges used by AT&T.

The international version of the phone should arrive around April 5; no word yet on its AT&T launch.

Source: FCC

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!