Droid 2 Global, Samsung Intercept About to Receive Updates

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Taking a break from all the new smartphone hardware we’ve been looking into over the past few days, this evening we learn of maintenance updates in the pipe for a couple older Android handsets. Both the Droid 2 Global on Verizon and Samsung’s Intercept on Sprint will soon be getting some updated software.

The Intercept’s update, bringing the phone up to system build FB01, looks like relatively minor one, by all accounts. Considering the fiasco Sprint went through when delivering the QWERTY slider’s Froyo update, keeping things short and sweet sounds like a smart idea. One bugfix this update will deliver will help the Intercept get a lock on GPS birds. Another offers unspecified security fixes, which may be code for removing Carrier IQ. The final bugfix corrects a condition where the phone couldn’t save changes to its Preferred Roaming List.

The Droid 2 Global sounds like it’s getting a slightly more substantial update, at least according to the changelog. There’s a whole mess of bugfixes in software 4.5.629, including ones targeting problems with saving camera settings, resets while playing music, memory errors, and the phone turning-on all by itself. Other changes in this release include improved ringtone support, the introduction of emergency alerts, and better performance when using the mobile hotspot.

The Samsung Intercept should start getting its update tomorrow. We’re not sure when the D2G’s will start on Verizon, but it’s just a matter of time now.

Source: Sprint, Verizon

Via: Droid-life, Phone Dog

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!