Google Talks Future of Chrome for Android

Advertisement

About two weeks ago, Google gave Android users a new browser option, introducing the first public beta for the mobile Android edition of its Chrome browser. We’ve been quite impressed with our experiences using it thus far, but seeing as this is still a very early release, there’s plenty of room for the app to grow and change from here. Google’s Sundar Pichai, head of all things Chrome, recently sat down to answer some questions about the company’s work on the browser, including future developments for the Android version.

So far, even with limited availability due to its Ice Cream Sandwich requirement, Pichai reports that Google is really happy with Chrome’s download rate. Mozilla is known for popping-out regular releases to Firefox every month or two; it’s not clear if Google will be updating Chrome with the same regularity, but Pichai says new versions will arrive “at a pretty healthy pace” and we should see advancements on the app taking “leaps and bounds”.

As far as new features go, top on the list for the moment are full-screen rendering and support for a default desktop browsing mode. After all, with advances in smartphone processing power, mobile data speeds, and screen quality, it’s becoming increasingly unnecessary to rely on a site’s purpose-built mobile edition. Pichai also visits the topic of Flash support, which unsurprisingly seems like a non-starter.

Source: CNET

Via: Droid-life

Advertisement
What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!