Will New Texas Instruments NFC Chip Help Spread Deployment?

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Near Field Communications has the potential to make a number of the things we do with our phones quite a bit easier. Someday, we all might tap our phones to exchange contact info, use our phones to unlock doors, and keep all our store loyalty cards in one, convenient place. Problem is, it currently can take some effort to track-down a phone supporting NFC. For uses of the technology that rely on multiple parties all having NFC-compliant handsets, the sad state of NFC deployment is especially problematic. We’re not sure just what it will take in order to get NFC-capable phones into the hands of a sizable fraction of smartphone users, but a new chip announced by Texas Instruments might end up playing a role.

The WiLink 8.0 family of components represent a one-stop-shop for your phone’s (non-cellular) wireless connectivity needs. The chip handles WiFi, Bluetooth, satellite positioning (both GPS and Russia’s GLONASS), and key to our interests today, NFC. The hope is that this chip will lead to increased NFC deployment as it allows manufacturers to introduce the functionality without requiring a dedicated NFC component, taking up less space in future phone designs.

We haven’t heard just which manufacturers might be interested in using the WiLink 8.0 in their phones, but samples of the chips are already going out to interested parties.

Source: TI

Via: Electronista

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!