First Chrome for Android Easter Eggs Discovered

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Google gave Android users a new browser option yesterday when it finally released a version of Chrome for smartphones. While it’s still considered a beta release, impressions of the browser have thus far been extremely positive. We gave you a quick look at it in action, since not everyone yet has access to the Ice-Cream-Sandwich-running hardware required, taking note of Chrome’s impressive tab management. Had our video run a bit longer (quite a bit), though, and we might have run across one of the Easter eggs already discovered for the app.

Chrome will keep track of how many tabs you currently have open. If you’re not paying much attention to what you’re doing, or just want to show your disdain for how much RAM your phone’s manufacturer thought to include, and end up opening an obscene number of tabs, you might notice the first minor surprise; instead of rolling-over to 100, a triple-digit tab count is represented with a smiley emoticon.

The second hidden treat that’s been uncovered has to do with the stack that shows all your open tabs. Reach the top of the list, then continue trying to swipe upwards. After five attempts, you’ll see the screen flip around, doing a 360. Look closely, and you’ll spot a hidden Chrome logo on the rear.

For all we know, this is just the tip of the iceberg, and there could be other little surprises in Chrome just waiting to be discovered.

Source: CNET

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!