Will Windows Phone 8 use Windows 8’s Kernel?

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Stephen Chapman of ZDnet has found a few clues that point towards the next next version of Windows Phone codenamed Apollo as possibly using the same core technologies as the full Windows 8 operating system. There are a couple of references in a few different ex-employee online resumes and HTC employee references that seem to indicate that it might be true.

Today Microsoft revealed some details about how Windows 8 will work at their Build conference keynote. Many things are very familiar to Windows Phone users. Windows 8 will support the exact same application development technologies as Windows Phone 7 (plus a few old ones like Win32 and a few new ones like HTML5.) It will also sport ARM processor support, 5 second boot up times, background updates of live tiles, battery saving features, system-wide hardware accelerated graphics and a fully touch-friendly interface. In the keynote you could even see a few existing Windows Phone games show up as Windows 8 live tiles, and it was demonstrated that building a Windows Phone version of a Windows 8 app could take as little as changing one line of code.

Perhaps it’s a good thing that Windows Phone 7 never allowed development of apps using native code. Since they all currently use Silverlight, XAML and XNA, Microsoft can easily switch to the new Apollo Windows 8 kernel in the future without breaking anything (in theory). Now, with a full Windows 8 kernel on your phone, think about how scalable that will be. You’ll have instant support for multiple processors, multiple cores, multiple displays, 256 terabyte disk drives, etc.

Source: ZDnet viaWPCentral

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About The Author
Adam Z. Lein
Adam has had interests in combining technology with art since his first use of a Koala pad on an Apple computer. He currently has a day job as a graphic designer, photographer, systems administrator and web developer at a small design firm in Westchester, NY. His love of technology extends to software development companies who have often implemented his ideas for usability and feature enhancements. Mobile computing has become a necessity for Adam since his first Uniden UniPro PC100 in 1998. He has been reviewing and writing about smartphones for Pocketnow.com since they first appeared on the market in 2002.Read more about Adam Lein!