Google Docs Gets Offline Mode, Tablet Improvements

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Storing data in the cloud can offer smartphone users a lot of practical advantages, like the ability to access your files from multiple devices with ease, all while freeing-up storage space on your handset. In spite of those benefits, the cloud won’t do you much good when you can’t reach it; trusting important documents to the cloud means trusting that you’ll be able to find an internet connection when you need to access them. Google has a new update out for Google Docs today that takes aim at just that issue, letting you locally backup files to your phone for offline access.

In order to access a specific file while offline, all you’ll have to do is long-press it in the app’s Document List and select “make available offline”. If you don’t have a data connection at the time, the app will remember your request and retrieve the file next chance it gets. Docs will also keep track of the file’s status on Google’s servers, and let you know if the copy on your phone is up-to-date with the latest edits.

In addition to this offline mode, Google Docs is getting a revamped layout for Android tablets. The company claims that the app now takes advantage of all the extra pixels on a tablet’s screen to display files in high resolution. You’ll also see new navigation controls, with a slider for convenient access within documents.

Google Docs 1.0.43 is available in the Android Market now.

Source: Google

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!