Steam Beta Opens, But Where Are The Third-Party Apps?

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Last week, we told you about the arrival of official companion apps for Valve’s Steam service, coming to both Android and iOS. The software joined the ranks of the third-party tools we previously saw released, and while the official version offered increased functionality, like the ability to use Steam chat, the requirement of needing an invitation to Valve’s closed beta test made accessing the official app difficult for many users, keeping interest up in those third-party solutions. This week, things flip on their head, as the beta starts to open-up, and third-party apps start to disappear.

We told you about one of these third-party Android Steam apps earlier this month, but if you go to check it out now, you’ll find it missing from the Android Market. The tale is the same for other such releases, and though a couple stragglers remain, the large portion of this type of app is now gone from the Market. The big question, that no one seems to have the answer to at the moment, is if these actions represent some sort of collective decision by these developers that signifies their work is no longer needed in the face of an official app, or if it’s possible that Valve put pressure either on Google or the developers themselves to take down those unofficial apps.

Whatever the reason for those old Steam apps vanishing, it’s now easy enough to get started with the official version that you might not even miss them. If you’ve got a registered Steam account on your PC, that’s all the qualifications you’ll need to get access to the beta. Check out the latest version of the app in the Android Market or Apple’s App Store.

Source: Valve (Android Market), Android Community

Via: Android Central

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!