Lumia 900 Coming to Rogers in Canada this May?

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For as much excitement as Nokia’s initial stab at Windows Phone devices caused, especially regarding the Lumia 800, there was no lost enthusiasm for the announcement of the follow-up Lumia 900 at this year’s CES. At least, AT&T subscribers had reason to be happy, upon receiving word that the carrier would be Nokia’s exclusive launch partner for the phone. The rest of us started to grow a little concerned wondering just when we’d get a chance to pick up the handset; would the AT&T exclusive be US-only, with other plans for international markets? That puzzle started coming together in the weeks that followed, and a rumor arrived that Nokia was preparing a Lumia 910 for release in Europe. Today we’re looking at the handset’s fate in the Great White North, and a rumor about just how it might arrive.

Supposedly, Canadian carrier Rogers will be the first in the nation to have access to the Lumia 900; these rumors specifically talk about the 900, not the 910. The timetable, though, fits with what we’ve heard about plans for the 910’s release; both the 900 in Canada and the 910 in Europe are supposed to show up in May. As a result, it’s looking like AT&T really might have a worldwide exclusive for a bit over a month before anyone else gets access to the hardware.

Today’s rumors don’t address what Rogers might end up charging for the Lumia 900, but there’s plenty of time to go before May for that information to find its way out.

Source: MobileSyrup

Via: Unwired View

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!