Samsung Considering the Note’s S Pen Stylus for Future Tablets

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Samsung gave us a lot to love about the Galaxy Note, from its extra-large HD screen, to its S Pen stylus input. That latter feature opens a new world of extra-precise touchscreen control, while also providing a pressure-sensitive form of input missing from most smartphones. Compared to the bulkier, battery-powered HTC Scribe stylus, the S Pen really comes off as sleek and sophisticated. If you’ve been jealous of the Note’s exclusive access to the S Pen, you’ll be glad to know that Samsung may have plans for bringing S Pen technology to more devices, including future tablets.

Samsung’s Ryan Bidan recently spoke with Laptop Magazine, discussing tablets, TouchWiz, and the Samsung user experience. After touching on the Note, Bidan responded to a question about the possibility for the S Pen to make its way to additional Samsung hardware, saying, “I think a pen interface continues to make a lot of sense across a number of screen sizes, like the larger is more obvious of those. That’s about as specific as I can be without announcing a product.”

Samsung will have to integrate Wacom digitizer hardware into future S-Pen-compatible devices, which is likely to manifest as slightly-higher retail prices; unlike a simple capacitive stylus, the S Pen requires special hardware support. If Samsung were to add the feature across its whole tablet lineup, that could go a long way towards further distinguishing its offerings from those of other tablet manufacturers.

Source: Laptop Magazine

Via: phoneArena

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!