Sprint Petition Seeks Broader Selection of Windows Phone Devices

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Some comments made by Sprint exec David Owens a couple days ago really stirred-up some heated emotions in Windows Phone fans. Owens talked about the carrier’s experience with the HTC Arrive, the only Windows Phone handset offered on the network, and painted it as a phone that customers just didn’t understand or were unhappy with the user interface. He placed the blame for this situation on Microsoft, which he felt hadn’t adequately been informing the public about the platform and cultivating enthusiasm for its family of smartphones. In the comments from our post, site readers showed a good deal of frustration towards Sprint’s message, arguing that Sprint itself was guilty of not giving Windows Phone the chance to shine. Apparently this sentiment is quite widespread, and has now built momentum to the point where those behind it have put together a petition.

The petition hopes to show Sprint that there really is enthusiasm for Windows Phone devices, if only the carrier would offer its subscribers a decent selection of handsets.

Currently at just past 1,400 signatures, the petition is hoping to hit 2,000. We don’t seriously expect an effort of this size to result in the carrier suddenly offering new Windows Phone hardware, but if you’d still like your voice heard, maybe hoping to affect Sprint decision-making down the line, head on over and put down your virtual John Hancock, along with any comments you’d like to share with other supporters.

Source: SignOn.org

Via: WMPoweruser

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!