Sprint LTE Smartphones Will Nearly All Support NFC

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Despite NFC being a mainstream smartphone feature for well over a year now, its adoption still seems very hit-and-miss, with little sign of a concerted effort to make NFC as common as Bluetooth. That’s a problem, at least for the carriers and financial services companies behind plans to popularize mobile payments conducted over NFC. Other uses for the technology, like direct communications between two NFC-enabled phones, are similarly slow to take off, and are even more hampered by a lack of phones with hardware support. Sprint, to its credit, may be able to help do something about the deployment of NFC in smartphones, revealing plans to see the feature included in the vast majority of its upcoming LTE fleet.

Sprint’s director of consumer product marketing, Trevor Van Norman, has disclosed that the carrier is very interested in NFC adoption. To that end, it’s going to see that, whenever possible, phones built for use on its new LTE network will feature the technology. The only exception Van Norman offered would be for the lowest-tier of LTE phones Sprint ends up carrying, where concerns about offering them cheap or free on-contract might preclude the expense of implementing NFC.

Of course, Sprint’s got it’s own interests at the heart of this policy, with Van Norman explaining, “it’s in our best interest to push the service… we want to drive transactions, but it’s to get a cut of the offer.” Sounds fine by us, so long as someone finally does something to put an end to the stagnation that’s been looming over NFC thus far.

Source: Light Reading Mobile

Via: SprintFeed

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!